SSILA

The Society for the Study of the Indigenous Languages of the Americas

SSILA 2016

SSILA 2016 Winter Meeting

January 7-10, 2016

Washington, D.C.

Business Meeting

The business meeting agenda for this year may be downloaded here.

Program

Many of the materials from presentations can be downloaded! Simply click on the title of the talk to download its materials.

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Contents

Thursday Evening

Algonquian, Iroquoian

Chair: Willem de Reuse (University of North Texas)

  • 4:00 – Language contact between Proto-Algonquian, Kutenai, and Salish
    • Richard Rhodes (University of California, Berkeley)
  • 4:30 – Neutralized position classes inhibit conflicting aspect values in Cherokee
    • Marcia Haag (University of Oklahoma)
  • 5:00 – An interactive Cherokee dictionary interface
    • Chris Koops (University of New Mexico)
    • Evan Lloyd (University of Colorado at Boulder)
  • 5:30 – The syntax and prosody of Onondaga interrogatives
    • Michael Barrie (Sogang University)
  • 6:00 – Traveling further down the grammaticalization pathway: Evidence from the Coincident prefix in Wendat
    • Megan Lukaniec (University of California Santa Barbara)
  • 6:30 – The Kinzie manuscript’s implications for Wyandot (Iroquoian)
    • Craig Kopris (Waⁿdat Yanǫhšetsih)

Oto-Manguean and Misumalpan

Chair: Ivy Doak (SSILA)

  • 4:00 – Possession in Pame
    • Bernhard Hurch (Institut für Sprachwissenschaft, Universität Graz)
  • 4:30 – Twentieth century sound change in Zenzontepec Chatino and Tataltepec Chatino
    • J. Ryan Sullivant (University of Texas at Austin)
  • 5:00 – Applying Kaufman’s model of Zapotec verb classification to Sierra Juárez Zapotec
    • Katherine Riestenberg (Georgetown University)

Pomoan, Miwok

Chair: Siri Tuttle (University of Alaska Fairbanks)

  • 4:00 – Proto Miwok intrusive *-Vˑ-
    • Catherine Callaghan (Ohio State University)
  • 4:30 – The Kashaya language during the Russian period
    • Eugene Buckley (University of Pennsylvania)
  • 5:00 – Northeastern Pomo as a relictual speech community
    • Neil Walker (San Joaquin Delta College)
  • 5:30 – Layers in Patwin: Double case marking and the Miwok substrate
    • Lewis Lawyer (University of California, Davis)

Friday Morning

Algonquian

Chair: Richard Rhodes (University of California, Berkeley)

  • 9:00 – Pitch accent in Maliseet-Passamaquoddy: An instrumental study
    • Philip Lesourd (Indiana University)
  • 9:30 – Acoustic realization of a distinctive, frequent glottal stop: the Arapaho example
    • D. H. Whalen (CUNY, Haskins Laboratories Yale University)
    • Christian Dicanio (University of Buffalo, Haskins Laboratories)
    • Christopher Geissler (Yale University, Haskins Laboratories)
    • Hannah M. King (Haskins Laboratories)
  • 10:00 – Phonetic investigation of vowel-consonant coalescence in Blackfoot
    • Mizuki Miyashita (University of Montana)
  • 10:30 – On the pragmatic relationship indexed by Long Distance Agreement in Meskwaki
    • Amy Dahlstrom (University of Chicago)
  • 11:00 – Animacy and event conceptualization in Mi’gmaq
    • Carol-Rose Little (Cornell University)
  • 11:30 – Information structure conditioned word order in Potawatomi
    • Robert Lewis (University of Chicago)

Organized Session: Paradigms found: Dialogic syntax as a grammar discovery method for field linguistics

Organizers: John W. Du Bois (University of California, Santa Barbara) and Mark A. Sicoli (Georgetown University)

  • 9:00 – The pervasive parallelism of Mayan: Dialogic syntax before, during, and after the field
    • John W. Du Bois (University of California, Santa Barbara)
  • 9:30 – Contrasts and parallelisms: Focal and framing resonance in Lachixío Zapotec
    • Mark A. Sicoli (Georgetown University)
  • 10:00 – Dialogic resonance as a window onto grammar and culture: a case study in Zenzontepec Chatino
    • Eric Campbell (University of California, Santa Barbara)
  • 10:30 – Dialogic resonance, multilingual interaction, and grammatical change: A view from the Amazonian Vaupés
    • Patience Epps (University of Texas, Austin)
  • 11:00 – Dialogic syntax as a method for linguistic analysis: Analysis by workshop participants of transcribed archival materials on languages of the Americas
    • John W. Du Bois (University of California, Santa Barbara)
    • Mark A. Sicoli (Georgetown University)
    • Eric Campbell (University of California, Santa Barbara)
    • Patience Epps (University of Texas, Austin)

Mayan

Chair: Gabriela Perez-Baez (Smithsonian)

  • 9:00 – A tale of two rats: Gender as differentiation in Mopan Maya
    • Ellen Contini-Morava (University of Virginia)
  • 9:30 – Prosodic boundary marking in Ch’ol: Acoustic indicators and their applications
    • Cora Lesure (McGill University)
    • Lauren Clemens (McGill University)
  • 10:00 – How many ‘antipassives’ are there? A typology of antipassive-type constructions in Kaqchikel
    • Raina Heaton (University of Hawai’i at Manoa)
  • 10:30 – Wh-Expressions in non-interrogative contexts in Kaqchikel
    • Harold Torrence (University of California, Los Angeles)
    • Philip Duncan (University of Kansas)
  • 11:00 – Perfect ‘status’ and its relationship to morphosyntax in Kaqchikel
    • Raina Heaton (University of Hawai’i at Manoa)
    • Judith Maxwell (Tulane University)
  • 11:30 – The polyfunctionality of the particle ‘k’al’ in Q’anjobal
    • Junwen Lee (Brown University)

Friday Afternoon

Emmon Bach Memorial Symposium

Chair: Patricia Shaw (University of British Columbia)

  • 2:00 – Welcoming remarks
    • Barbara Partee (University of Massachusetts, Amherst)
  • 2:05 – Word formation and the use of paradigms in Young and Morgan’s A Navajo Language (1980,1987)
    • Joyce McDonough (University of Rochester)
  • 2:30 – Meskwaki kek(i) particles and human hearts
    • Lucy Thomason (Smithsonian)
  • 3:00 – On the development of North Wakashan
    • Emmon Bach
    • Darin Flynn (University of Calgary)
  • 3:30 – A Haisla-Chinook Jargon-Tsimshian wordlist, ca. 1900
    • Sally Thomason (University of Michigan)
  • 4:00 – Laryngeal architecture in Kwak’wala
    • Patricia A. Shaw (University of British Columbia)
  • 4:30 – Announcement of the Emmon Bach Fellowship Fund
    • Alyson Reed (Linguistic Society of America)

    Other tributes and memories

Saturday Morning

Salishan, Souian, Caddoan, Tanoan

Chair: Ewa Czaykowska-Higgins (University of Victoria)

  • 9:00 – The semantics and pragmatics of Skwxwú7mesh evidentials
    • Carrie Gillon (Arizona State University)
    • Peter Jacobs (University of Victoria)
  • 9:30 – On identifying an aspectual suffix in Sliammon
    • Honore Watanabe (ILCAA, Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
  • 10:00 – Sluicing in Missouri River Siouan
    • Brittany Williams (UW-Madison)
  • 10:30 – Falling tone in Tanoan
    • David L. Shaul (University of Arizona)
    • Scott Ortman (University of Colorado)
  • 11:00 – A preliminary study on accentuation in Hidatsa
    • John Boyle (California State University, Fresno)
    • Ryan Kasak (Yale University)
    • Sarah Lundquist (University of Wisconsin, Madison)
    • Armik Mirzayan (University of South Dakota)
    • Jonnia Torres (University of Colorado, Boulder)
    • Brittany Williams (University of Wisconsin, Madison)

Chibchan, Tupian, Zamucoan, Matacoan, Quechuan

Chair: Harriet Klein (Stony Brook University)

  • 9:00 – Ergative and relativization in Bribri
    • Adriana Molina-Muñoz (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
    • Rolando Coto-Solano (University of Arizona)
  • 9:30 – Memory as source of evidence in Paraguayan Guarani
    • Maura Velazquez (Colorado State University)
  • 10:00 – Towards a critical edition of Ignace Chomé’s Vocabulario de la lengua zamuca
    • Luca Ciucci (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa)
  • 10:30 – A diachronic account of grammatical nominalization in Nivaĉle
    • Manuel Otero (University of Oregon)
    • Alejandra Vidal (CONICET / Universidad Nacional de Formosa)
  • 11:00 – Negative imperatives and polarity items in Quechua
    • Liliana Sanchez (Rutgers University)
  • 11:30 – The morphosyntax of Projective and non-Projective PPs in Mayangna
    • Elena Benedicto (Purdue University)
    • Elizabeth Salomón (The University of the Autonomous Regions of the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua)

Hokan and Uto-Aztecan

Chair: Carolyn MacKay (Ball State University)

  • 9:00 – Examining language attrition through Chimariko texts
    • Carmen Jany (California State University, San Bernardino)
  • 9:30 – Karuk verbal morphology
    • Clare Sandy (University of California, Berkeley)
  • 10:00 – On the so-called “purposive” verbs in Nahuatl
    • Mitsuya Sasaki (University of Tokyo)
  • 10:30 – An acoustic outlook on initial stops in Northern Shoshoni
    • Karee Garvin (University of Iowa)
  • 11:00 – The vowel system of Southern Ute: A phonetic investigation
    • Stacey Oberly (University of Arizona)
    • Viktor Kharlamov (Florida Atlantic University)
  • 11:30 – The evolution of lexical accent in Cupeño
    • Anthony Yates (University of California, Los Angeles)

Saturday afternoon

Muskogean

Chair: George Aaron Broadwell (University of Florida)

  • 4:00 – Documentation and revitalization strategies for agglutinative languages: Lessons from Chickasaw inflectional paradigms
    • Colleen Fitzgerald (University of Texas at Arlington)
    • Joshua Hinson (Chickasaw Language Revitalization Program)
  • 4:30 – Acquiring Chickasaw morphology through a master-apprentice program
    • Juliet Morgan (University of Oklahoma)
  • 5:00 – The role of context in interpreting a versatile modal in Creek (Muskogean)
    • Kimberly Johnson (University of Texas at Arlington)

Digital domains, Barbacoan

Chair: Elena Benedicto (Purdue University)

  • 4:00 – Emerging digital domains for Native American languages
    • Gary Holton (University of Alaska Fairbanks)
  • 4:30 – Categorization–Similarities between nominal and verb/event classifying systems
    • Connie Dickinson (Universidad Regional Amazónica-Ikiam)
  • 5:00 – Imbabura Quichua “impersonals” in the dictionary
    • Pamela Munro (University of California, Los Angeles)

Macro Je, Jivaroan

Chair: Patience Epps (University of Texas at Austin)

  • 4:00 – Toponymy as a historical tool: The linguistic past of the Chicham language family
    • Martin Kohlberger (Leiden University)
  • 4:30 – Metrical tone, lexical tone and grammatical tone: On word prosody in Wampis
    • Jaime Pena (University of Oregon)
  • 5:00 – Hearing as knowing in Macro-Jê: on the diachronic stability of conceptual metaphors
    • Eduardo Ribeiro (Smithsonian Institution)

Sunday Morning

Chitimacha, Timucua, and Piaroa-Saliban

Chair: Lucy Thomason (Smithsonian Institute)

  • 9:00 – The extension of structure to discourse: Chitimacha participles in discourse and diachrony
    • Daniel W. Hieber (University of California, Santa Barbara)
  • 9:30 – Active agreement in Timucua
    • George Aaron Broadwell (University of Florida)
  • 10:00 – The origin of the Piaroa subject markers -sæ, -hæ, and -Ø
    • Jorge Emilio Rosés Labrada (University of British Columbia)

Dene, Unangam Tunuu (Aleut), Gitksan (Tsimshian)

Chair: Alice Taff (University of Alaska Southeast)

  • 9:00 – Marking the unexpected: Evidence from Navajo to support a metadiscourse domain
    • Kayla Palakurthy (Eisman) (University of California Santa Barbara)
  • 9:30 – Field research among a vanishing voice: Is the Navajo language thriving or endangered?
    • Melvatha Chee (University of New Mexico)
  • 10:00 – Functions of the ‘future’ and ‘optative’ in Upper Tanana Athabascan
    • Olga Lovick (First Nations University of Canada)
  • 10:30 – Lexical differentiation in Aleut (Unangam Tunuu)
    • Anna Berge (University of Alaska Fairbanks)
  • 11:00 – Genitive/ergative in Gitksan
    • Colin Brown (McGill University)
Updated: July 28, 2017 — 1:31 pm
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